June 30, 2011

Wisconsin Supreme Court quote of the day

Justice [Louis] Butler was a popular member of the court and a person who was somewhat successful in building bridges among the members of the court. — Attorney Lester Pines
Nice going, WMC/Gableman. And wouldn't you know, it is exactly that contingent now complaining about lack of leadership on the court.

Link to video. Lester Pines is on from 37:00 to 45:00, speaking truths.

Next up is James Troupis, who says of allegations David Prosser grabbed Justice Ann Walsh Bradley around the neck with both hands: "You do have to chuckle about that." Is that so? Troupis was Prosser's attorney during the aftermath of the April 5 Supreme Court election, incidentally.

I suppose that could be the quote of the day, but for different reasons.

8 comments:

gnarlytrombone said...

WMC/Gableman

Just about everything fits here...

illusory tenant said...

lol

gnarlytrombone said...

Watching that video, it's starkly apparent why whatever camp Troupis belongs to has to buy its outcomes. Shazam.

Ron R said...

So your saying if "Loophole Louie" was on the court he would be the leader? I doubt it. If he had tried, Chief Shirley would probably have bitch slapped him.

John said...

Louis Butler being appointed to the Supreme Court was the only reason Crooks stayed on the court.

illusory tenant said...

No, Ron. He's a conciliator, is what Pines is saying.

illusory tenant said...

Need to rid myself of that Flash thing.

illusory tenant said...

By the way, Ron, Gableman's defense of his use of the term "loophole" in his notorious teevee ad was utterly fatuous. In the case in question, it was the State which sought to recast the meaning of the statute, whereas Butler's reasoning rested on the plain, unequivocal words in the black letter law (you know, that sacred "conservative" version of how to read and interpret the law).

And indeed a unanimous Supreme Court affirmed Butler on that account. And even if you insist, as Gableman did, that the defense was exploiting a "loophole" -- which is demonstrably false -- it was not even Butler who "found it." It was "found" by the defendant's trial counsel, who objected to the introduction of the evidence in contention. Butler undertook the appeal of the trial court's ruling to admit the evidence, which was the defendant's right.