September 21, 2009

Speaking of Milwaukee attorneys

It wouldn't exactly break David Ziemer's heart if local legend Alan Eisenberg got his ticket pulled once and for all. I'm aware of Mr. Eisenberg and his reputation, but the circumstances surrounding the 1968 suicide of Judge John Krueger were news to me. Appalling.

11 comments:

David Ziemer said...

we ran an updated version. if you want it to link properly, you'll have to redo it.

illusory tenant said...

Done, and thanks kindly.

Zach W. said...

Kind of off topic, but would you agree with Ziemer's assertion that most DV allegations are false?

illusory tenant said...

He said "many" of the allegations are false. But I can't really comment, without knowing what set of allegations he's referring to.

Zach W. said...

My bad....many, not most.

illusory tenant said...

I might agree that defendants claim many DV allegations are false.

five tomatoes said...

I've dealt with him before and had no idea of his past history. How can he still be practicing?

illusory tenant said...

Or wearing those hats.

David Ziemer said...

anytime you are dealing with a crime involving people who know eachother well, which, in dv cases, is all of them, the rate of false allegations will far exceed the rate in other crimes.

Zach W. said...

False allegations, or allegations the victim later recants? After all, it's not uncommon for DV victims to recant their allegations, but that hardly means the allegations are false.

David Ziemer said...

sometimes the allegations are true, sometimes the victim recants even though he's guilty, and sometimes the allegations are patently false. the last dv case i did, i went to the house to check out the lay of the land, and it was patently obvious the allegations were false, simply because if they were true, the television, and a bunch of other furniture would have been totalled. also, the only bruises she had were consistent with the defendant restraining her -- not a bruise on the face, despite allegations of closed fist punches to the face.

but nobody ever calls up the police and fabricates a robbery. they might identify the wrong person in a lineup, and you can work with that. but you're not going to get anywhere cross-examing the victim about whether or not a robbery occurred in the first place.